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Arizona Public Lands Search Map

Whenever you plan to head out on to your public lands, it's always wise to call ahead to the Field Office or Ranger Station that oversees your destination to check on local conditions. Point and click at the interactive map above to search all of the state's recreation sites for phone numbers and other details.

Arizona Fire News

Open with no restrictions » click to see 299 recreation sites
Open with Stage I restrictions » click to see 227 recreation sites

April 2014 Wildfire and Recreation Report for Arizona
What's Open in Arizona
Arizona Fire Restrictions
Arizona Fire Closures
Press Section » official agency Press Releases and/or Restriction and Closure Orders


Latest Fire News

April 2014 Wildfire and Recreation Report for Arizona
As of April 2014 all public lands in Arizona are OPEN

Please read the notices below and in the press section carefully before you take off for outdoor activities.

And remember, fireworks are ALWAYS ILLEGAL on public lands!!




The Safford Air Operations Center is maintained by the Bureau of Land Management.

What's Open in Arizona
All public lands in Arizona are open, with no fire restgrictions.

It's always wise to call ahead to the Field Office or Ranger Station that oversees your destination to check on local conditions.




Arizona Fire Restrictions
Different land managing agencies establish their fire restrictions for their lands in different ways. Some use National Forest or Ranger District boundaries, county lines or their agency-based administrative areas. Use the maps found throughout this website to clarify where you might be restricted from using fires. Download the pdf map here to find county or national forest boundaries.

NATIONAL FORESTS AND GRASSLANDS

All districts are OPEN, with no fire restrictions.

As conditions continue to dry and warm across much of northern Arizona, fire managers on the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests and Grand Canyon National Park have moved several areas into ‘High’ fire danger. Other areas remain in ‘Low’ or ‘Moderate’ fire danger due to localized moisture conditions.

“High” fire danger means wildfires can start easily from most causes and that small fuels (such as grasses and needles) will ignite readily. Unattended campfires and brush fires are likely to escape and spread easily.

CNF: Mogollon Rim Ranger District: Moderate Fire Danger
CNF: Flagstaff Ranger District: Moderate Fire Danger
CNF: Red Rock Ranger District: High Fire Danger
KNF: North Kaibab Ranger District: Low Fire Danger
KNF: Tusayan Ranger District: High Fire Danger
KNF: Williams Ranger District: High Fire Danger
GCNP: South Rim High Fire Danger
GCNP: North Rim Low Fire Danger

While there are no restrictions or closures in effect at this time, all forest and park visitors are asked to use caution with campfires and other ignition sources such as cigarettes.

NATIONAL PARKS AND MONUMENTS

National Parks and Monuments maintain different restrictions on cooking and campfires year round - use the interactive map above to locate individual sites and check the site's page for local restrictions.

BLM LANDS

Fire restrictions have been lifted for all BLM-managed public lands, including the Arizona Strip.

STATE PARKS

ALL state lands and parks are OPEN
For more information please visit the State Parks fire restrictions page for more information on specific State Park fire restrictions.

TRIBAL LANDS

Although Native American tribal governments cooperate in federal and state fire prevention plans and activities, one should always remember that tribal lands are not public lands.




Arizona Fire Closures
Local conditions sometimes require land managers to close access or use of areas within their jurisdiction. Many of the closures below were posted without expiration dates. Call the contact information on the site page for current conditions. Always check with the local land management office before venturing out on to Arizona's outdoor destinations.

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest

Auger Creek Area, Fish Creek Area, Middle Mountain Area, Milligan Valley Area, Prime Canyon Area, West Fork Area, West Fork Dispersed C.G. are all closed.

Click for the closure order and the associated map.

FR 8793 is the eastern boundary of the closure area and will be closed where it originates on FR 25B, for the entirety of its length of 2.4 miles.

FR8793A, FR8793B, and FR8793C will be closed to vehicular traffic due to lack of access, but will be outside of the area closure.

The northern boundary will start where FR8693 makes a sharp turn to the south just past spur FR8793B. At the sharp turn, the boundary heads northwest 0.3 mi to the second small drainage, following it northwest for about 0.15 mi to Slaughter Draw. The Closure then follows Slaughter Draw to the south to the top of the draw where it meets FR25B, and along that road to the east,back to the intersection with FR8793.

To view this closure order and the associated map, please click here

Coconino National Forest

The Sandy’s Canyon Trail and Arizona Trail at Fisher Point have been temporarily closed.







Not OK to build a fire at an undeveloped campsite. Fishlake National Forest


But just fine to build a fire in this agency-build fire ring. White Horse Lake Campground, Kaibab National Forest

Stage I Restrictions
What's OK To Do - Stage I Restrictions

**Check postings at the campground on arrival for local conditions.**

Open campfires, charcoal grills and stove fires are OK in developed camp sites and picnic areas where agency-built fire rings or grills are provided. These are usually areas that charge campsite fees. Sometimes, you must get a campfire permit from the ranger or campground host. It's usually OK to use Pressurized liquid or gas stoves, lanterns and heaters.

Smoke in enclosed buildings, within vehicles equipped with ashtrays, on paved or surfaced roads, within developed recreation sites, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable material.

What's Not OK To Do - Stage I Restrictions

Open burning, i.e., burning of cropland, fields, rangeland, debris burning, slash piles, or weed burning, is PROHIBITED. At this level of fire restrictions, fire managers may use prescribed fire as a tool to reduce the risk of unwanted wildfire. Agency and tribal Fire Restrictions and Closures apply to undeveloped public lands as well as developed recreation areas.

Fireworks are ALWAYS ILLEGAL on public lands!!


Explanation of Fire Restrictions

Fire Restriction Definitions



Stay on the roads in your vehicles and make sure ATVs have spark arrestors.

Stage II Fire Restrictions
What's OK To Do - Stage II Restrictions

**Check postings at the campground on arrival for local conditions.**

Pressurized liquid or gas stoves, lanterns, or space-heating devices are OK. Be sure to check your gear before heading out to be sure it operates safely. Smoke ONLY inside an enclosed vehicle. Parking at developed campgrounds, picnic and trailheads is OK.

Internal or external combustion engines are OK, but must have properly installed, maintained, and working SPARK ARRESTORS.


What's Not OK To Do - Stage II Restrictions

NO open fires. Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, broiler, coal, or wood stove fire is PROHIBITED anywhere in the restricted area, even in developed recreation sites.

NO motor vehicles can go off road, except when parking in an area cleared of vegetation within 10 feet of the road.

Explosives are PROHIBITED.

Operating chainsaws, welding and other equipment powered by internal
combustion engines is usually RESTRICTED as well.

Agency and tribal Fire Restrictions and Closures apply to undeveloped public lands as well as developed recreation areas.

Fireworks are ALWAYS ILLEGAL on public lands!!


Explanation of Fire Restrictions

Fire Restriction Definitions



Prescribed burning in the Caribou National Forest

Prescribed Burning
There are two kinds of fires out on public lands that might cause some smoke:

One is your well-tended and thoroughly-OUT-when-you-leave-it CAMP FIRE and the other is a WILDLAND FIRE - that's any non-structure fire that occurs in the wildland.

There are also two types of wildland fires. They are wildfires and prescribed fires.

Wildfires are unplanned ignitions or prescribed fires that are declared wildfires. Some wildfires that occur naturally, by lightning, can be managed to achieve resource management objectives.

Prescribed fires are planned ignitions. They are ignited by agency personnel to meet specific objectives in order to prevent or reduce the intensity of any future wildfire.

Many agencies and tribes practice prescribed burning to eliminate excess fuels and reduce fire danger. Weather and environmental conditions play a key role in the timing and accomplishment of these projects. People in these areas will see and smell smoke for the duration of the burn; smoke inversions may occur during nighttime hours. As always, firefighter and public safety are the top priority.

Sometimes, naturally caused wildfires are allowed to burn for the same reasons. The objective of any such "managed" fire is to protect, maintain and enhance resources, and, as nearly as possible, allow fire to function in its natural ecological role within defined boundaries.

Before a fire is put into such status, land managers evaluate several criteria. For example, archaeologists and wildlife biologists inspect the area to ensure wildlife habitats and archaeological sites will not be harmed as a result of the fire or management practices. Before a fire can be actively managed, its boundaries and the weather and fuels conditions under which the fire will be allowed to burn are carefully established.

In both cases, agency fire managers follow strict guidelines, monitoring burn conditions and the generation of smoke.


Visit the NOAA website for air quality alerts


USEFUL LINKS FOR INFO ABOUT ACTIVE WILDFIRES

Click here for Active Wildfire Info for Arizona and New Mexico

Click here for Active Wildfire Info for other Western States


USEFUL LINKS FOR FIRE PREVENTION

Click here for info on How NOT To Start A Wildfire

Click here for info on How To Protect Your Home From Wildfire


GET THE KIDS INVOLVED

Click here for Fire Prevention Info From Smokey Bear




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