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Headwaters of the Snake Wild Rivers, Wyoming
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Description: The Snake River changes character in its long journey to the Columbia, but its headwaters all descend from snowy peaks, rushing down from the Tetons and the Gros Ventre Range to join the Snake River. Every summer, visitors and locals alike enjoy fishing in these pristine streams and rivers, soaking in hot springs near their banks, floating the scenic and whitewater stretches of the Snake, camping in the numerous campgrounds along the shores, and enjoying sightings of bald eagles, pelicans, cranes, osprey, moose, and other resident or migratory wildlife who find food by the river.

The following segments of the Snake River system are protected:
  • BAILEY CREEK- The 7-mile segment of Bailey Creek, from the divide with the Little Greys River north to its confluence with the Snake River, as a wild river.
  • BLACKROCK CREEK- The 22-mile segment from its source to the Bridger-Teton National Forest boundary, as a scenic river.
  • BUFFALO FORK OF THE SNAKE RIVER- The portions of the Buffalo Fork of the Snake River, consisting of the 55-mile segment consisting of the North Fork, the Soda Fork, and the South Fork, upstream from Turpin Meadows, as a wild river; the 14-mile segment from Turpin Meadows to the upstream boundary of Grand Teton National Park, as a scenic river; and the 7.7-mile segment from the upstream boundary of Grand Teton National Park to its confluence with the Snake River, as a scenic river.
  • CRYSTAL CREEK- The portions of Crystal Creek, consisting of the 14-mile segment from its source to the Gros Ventre Wilderness boundary, as a wild river; and the 5-mile segment from the Gros Ventre Wilderness boundary to its confluence with the Gros Ventre River, as a scenic river.
  • GRANITE CREEK- The portions of Granite Creek, consisting of the 12-mile segment from its source to the end of Granite Creek Road, as a wild river; and the 9.5-mile segment from Granite Hot Springs to the point 1 mile upstream from its confluence with the Hoback River, as a scenic river.
  • GROS VENTRE RIVER- The portions of the Gros Ventre River, consisting of the 16.5-mile segment from its source to Darwin Ranch, as a wild river; the 39-mile segment from Darwin Ranch to the upstream boundary of Grand Teton National Park, excluding the section along Lower Slide Lake, as a scenic river; and the 3.3-mile segment flowing across the southern boundary of Grand Teton National Park to the Highlands Drive Loop Bridge, as a scenic river.
  • HOBACK RIVER- The 10-mile segment from the point 10 miles upstream from its confluence with the Snake River to its confluence with the Snake River, as a recreational river.
  • LEWIS RIVER- The portions of the Lewis River, consisting of the 5-mile segment from Shoshone Lake to Lewis Lake, as a wild river; and the 12-mile segment from the outlet of Lewis Lake to its confluence with the Snake River, as a scenic river.
  • PACIFIC CREEK- The portions of Pacific Creek, consisting of the 22.5-mile segment from its source to the Teton Wilderness boundary, as a wild river; and the 11-mile segment from the Wilderness boundary to its confluence with the Snake River, as a scenic river.
  • SHOAL CREEK- The 8-mile segment from its source to the point 8 miles downstream from its source, as a wild river.
  • SNAKE RIVER- The portions of the Snake River, consisting of the 47-mile segment from its source to Jackson Lake, as a wild river; the 24.8-mile segment from 1 mile downstream of Jackson Lake Dam to 1 mile downstream of the Teton Park Road bridge at Moose, Wyoming, as a scenic river; and the 19-mile segment from the mouth of the Hoback River to the point 1 mile upstream from the Highway 89 bridge at Alpine Junction, as a recreational river, the boundary of the western edge of the corridor for the portion of the segment extending from the point 3.3 miles downstream of the mouth of the Hoback River to the point 4 miles downstream of the mouth of the Hoback River being the ordinary high water mark.
  • WILLOW CREEK- The 16.2-mile segment from the point 16.2 miles upstream from its confluence with the Hoback River to its confluence with the Hoback River, as a wild river.
  • WOLF CREEK- The 7-mile segment from its source to its confluence with the Snake River, as a wild river.


Location: These rivers can be accessed from various campgrounds and trailheads in the Bridger-Teton National Forest

Address: Supervisors Office
Bridger-Teton National Forest
340 North Cache
Jackson, WY  83001
Phone: (307) 739-5510

Season: spring - fall

Fee: for some sites

Reservations: some campgrounds: www.recreation.gov
Activities
Blue Box indicates availability  White Box indicates unavailability
 Biking  Fishing  Picnicking
 Boating (Motorized)  Hiking/Backpacking  Scenic Driving
 Boating (Non-motorized)  Horseback Riding  
 Boating (WW)  Hunting  Water Sports
 Camping    Wildlife Viewing
 Caving  Off Highway Vehicles  Winter Sports
 Climbing    

Services and Facilities
Blue Box indicates availability  White Box indicates unavailability  An A for Accessible indicates the service or facility is accessible to people with disabilities
 Visitor Center  Group Campgnd  RV Sites
  Exhibits  Campgnd, Primitive  Electric Hookup
 Interpretive Programs  Drinking Water  Dump Station
 Cultural-Historic Sites  Restrooms  Boat Ramp
 Campgnd, Developed  Showers  Marina
 Rental Cabins

Notes: Different regulations apply to different segments of this system. For information about recreation on a specific stretch, please contact the Forest Service.
Go ToTo Wild & Scenic Rivers

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